2017 Annual Conference Sessions: A Guide

44th Annual Conference on Sail Training and Tall Ships 2017
February 8-10, 2017
Boston, MA – Boston Seaport Hotel

Register Today!

Registration list 1.13.2017

Tuesday, February 7
1600 – 1800   Registration
1700 – 1800   Meet and Greet Reception – Sponsored by the Boston Seaport Hotel
1800 – 2100   Dinner on your own
2100 –             Mariner’s Pub Trivia

Wednesday, February 8: Forums
0700 – 1615  Educators and Administrators Forum
0700 – 0745 Breakfast and Registration
0745 – 0800 Welcome and Introductions
0800 – 0930 Session 1: Coping with Stress and Depression: How Program Leaders Can Help Themselves and Their Students
0930 – 1000 Refreshment Break
1000 – 1130  Session 2: “Mirror, Mirror on the wall”: Understanding and developing the role of facilitated self-reflection in sail-training programs
1130 – 1230 Lunch
1230 – 1400 Session 3: Strategies for Individual Fundraising: Drew McMullen
1400 – 1415 Break
1415 – 1500 Session 4: Communicating with impact philanthropists
1500 – 1545 Session 5: Fireside Chat with the Experts – open and honest answers about funding
1545 –  1615 Refreshment Break
1615 – 1730 Session 6: Presentations! How to get and hold their attention: Bryan Bissell
1730 – 1800 Closing Comments
1900 – 2100 Welcome Reception sponsored by Sail Boston® and the Greater Boston CVB

0700 – 1615  Safety Under Sail Forum
0700 – 0745 Breakfast and Registration
0745 – 0800 Welcome and Introductions
0800 – 0930 Stability
0930 – 1000 Refreshment Break
1000 – 1130 Best Practices
1130 – 1230 Lunch
1230 – 1400 Fatigue
1400 – 1415 Break
1415 – 1500 Fatigue (continued)
1500 – 1545 Moderated Open Forum
1545 – 1615 Refreshment Break
1900 – 2100 Welcome Reception sponsored by Sail Boston® and the Greater Boston CVB

1230 – 1615 Ports Seminar sponsored by Pearsco Solutions, Inc. – by invitation only
1230 -1300 
Welcome and General Updates
1300 – 1400  Session 1: Beyond the Table Top: Security discussion in today’s fragile world – Steve Sutch, Pearsco Solutions
1400 – 1415 Break
1415 – 1500 Session 2: Strategic Philanthropy Workshop/Corporate Sponsorship fireside chat: Honest questions, honest answers
1500 – 1600 Session 3: Lessons Learned: New and old ports share key learnings
1600-1615 Refreshment break

1615 – 1800 RDV 2017 Ships and Ports Session – Open to all interested in participating in the Rendez – Vous 2017 Tall Ships® Regatta
a. Port Presentations – Charleston, Boston, Halifax, Quebec City and outports
b. Races – Charleston to Bermuda; Bermuda to Boston; Boston to Canada
c. Presentation from Boston Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection
d. Update on new security regulations for Canada
1900 – 2100 Welcome Reception sponsored by Sail Boston® and the Greater Boston CVB

Thursday, February 9: Conference
0700 – 1715 Focus Sessions
0700 – 0800 Breakfast and Registration
0800 – 0815 Opening Remarks
0815 – 0830 Mayor’s Welcome
0830 – 0900 Keynote Address: Tim Runyan
0900 -0905 Housekeeping
0905 – 0915 Break
0915 – 1045 General Session: New Developments at Tall Ships America
1045 – 1115 Refreshment Break

1115 – 1230      FOCUS SESSION 1
F1A Dock Visits – Is your ship ready to visit, and is your port ready to receive them?
F1B HR for Marine Operators
F1C Limitless: How today’s disabled and veteran communities can become inspiring  participants in sail training
F1D Maritime Heritage Showcase A: Constitution, Ernestina, Adventure
1230 – 1415
Lunch – sponsored by G. H. Laco & Associates

1415 – 1530     FOCUS SESSIONS 2
F2A  A Look to the Future: Emerging Tech-Driven Trends and their Coming Impact on your Events
F2B Bound for Cuba: Challenges and opportunities for sail training programs voyaging to the Pearl of the Antilles
F2C Implementing Coast Guard Navigation and Inspection Circular 02-16: “Inspection Guidance for Sail Rigging and Masts on Inspected Sail Vessels
F2D Material Aquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration
1530 – 1600 Refreshment Break

1600 – 1715      FOCUS SESSIONS 3
F3A Bringing the Experience Aboard to the World via Video
F3B Keep Your Coverage: Ways you might be exposed/uncovered without even knowing it
F3C Navigating the Regulatory Seas
F3D Working with Gold Star Teens: Honoring Heroes and Healing Hearts
1715 –  Free Time

Friday, February 10: Conference
0700 – 1700 Focus Sessions
0700 – 0800 Registration
0700 – 0800 Breakfast sponsored by Ships Coy Forge
0800 – 0900 General Session At Sea Training Using the Auxiliary Sail Vessel Operations Textbook – Captain Andy Chase
0900 – 0905  Housekeeping
0905 -0930  Break

0930 – 1045        FOCUS SESSIONS 4
F4A Moderated Discussion Group: Business Planning
F4B  Weather Considerations for Transiting the Western Atlantic in the Fall and Spring – Joe Sienkiewicz
F4C  Education Program Showcase
1. Falmouth Schools
2. Boothbay Sea and Science Center
3. U.S. Sailing
4. United States Power Squadron
F4D TBD
1045 – 1115  Refreshment Break sponsored by Ships Coy Forge

1115 – 1230         FOCUS SESSIONS 5
F5A Cognitive Bias and Decision Making
F5B No Berth Unsold!
F5C  The Importance of Experiential Event Branding: Create Attendee Impact
F5D Maritime Heritage Showcase B: Wavertree, Elissa
1230 – 1300
Lunch Buffet
1300 – 1430  Annual Meeting
1430 – 1445 Break

1445 – 1600        FOCUS SESSIONS 6
F6A  RDV 2017
F6B  Medical Care Aboard Ship: Meeting regulatory requirements and managing risk
F6C  Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science
1. Tiffany Smyth, URI – Climate Change
2. Shelley Brown, Sailors for the Sea – Rainy Day Kits
3.  Rachael Miller, Rozalia Project – Microfiber Pollution and Solutions
F6D  Program Showcase: Oliver Hazard Perry, San Salvador, Piscataqua Maritime Commission
1600 – 1630   Refreshment Break sponsored by Ships Coy Forge
1630 – 1700 Clsing Comments
1700 – 1800 Free time
1800 – 1900  Cocktails (cash bar)
1900 – 2400 Gala Awards Dinner sponsored by Allen Insurance & Financial
Updated 1.19.2017

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Education Forum: Communicating with impact philanthropists

Communicating with impact philanthropists

What is impact philanthropy and what does it mean for my organizations? Increasingly philanthropists and funders and focused on impact and measurement, yet it can be difficult to understand or react to their desire to be more impact focused.  This workshop will examine what it means to be impact focused and how your organization can embrace some of the concepts of impact philanthropy so your organization can be more aligned with these funders and ultimately more focused on the impact it is trying to achieve.

Presented by
Christine Kendall, Founding Partner, SmarterGive

Christine Kendall
Christine Kendall

Christine Kendall is the Founding Partner of SmarterGive where she provides strategic advice on high-impact philanthropy to individuals, families and businesses.  At SmarterGive, she helps donors to be more effective grantmakers and ultimately to drive greater impact on the lives of others. Prior to SmarterGive, Christine spent much of her career in strategy consulting, at both LEK and FSG. While at FSG, a consulting firm focused exclusively on the social sector, she gained a deep knowledge and understanding social impact. She has not only worked with funders but has experience working with many non-profits, large collaboratives, and government organizations. She has extensive global development experience having worked on projects across the world. Prior to entering consulting, she worked for Dana-Farber Cancer Center, and several research think-tanks in Boston and Washington DC. She has also taught public health at an elementary school in Achaise, Ghana.  Christine has a master’s in healthcare management from the Harvard School of Public Health and a B.A. with honors in economics and history from Colby College. She lives with her family in Weston and, in her free time, she enjoys distance running, yoga, and travelling with her family.

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Focus Session: Material Acquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration

Material Acquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration

This panel, consisting of Dana Hewson, President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs, Margherita M. Desy, Historian, USS CONSTITUTION, and Harold Burnham, Burnham Boat Building, will discuss the challenges of acquiring materials, ranging from wood to iron, of the right size and quality for large timber restorations. The panel will discuss sourcing, repurposing, and sometimes altering the material for safety or need.

Dana Hewson
Dana Hewson

 

Dana Hewson is Vice President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs and Clark Senior Curator for Watercraft at Mystic Seaport. He has worked at the Museum for over 39 years. His areas of responsibility include the activities and operations of the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard Department, the Watercraft Programs Department as well as curatorial responsibility for the Watercraft Collection. He has served in ad advisory capacity for numerous vessel restoration projects and assisted with the development of the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines for Maritime Preservation, published in 1990. In 2001 he received the Don Turner Award from the USS CONSTITUTION Museum for lifetime achievement in the preservation of watercraft.

Marguerita Desy
Margherita Desy

Margherita M. Desy is the historian for the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston and USS Constitution. She has previously worked for Historic New England, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Hartford, and, for 20 years, at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.

Ms. Desy has a BA in History & Art History from the College of the Holy Cross, an MA in American Civilization from The George Washington University, and has studied at Sotheby’s Institute in London. She has been published in scholarly and popular journals and has been script advisor and on-camera historian for several PBS television shows and documentaries broadcast in the U.S. and Europe.

Harold Burnham
Harold Burnham

Harold Burnham grew up in the shipyards of Essex and is known for utilizing traditional “sawn fame and trunnel fasting methods” on his adaptations of historic Cape Ann designs for commercial passenger use. Some of his “passenger fishermen” include, the Fredonia schooner THOMAS E. LANNON, The Privateer FAME, and his family boat the pinky ARDELLE all of which are certified by the Coast Guard for 49 passengers. He has worked on repaired and consulted on a number of other historic vessels and preservation projects including the Gundalow Piscataqua, The Schooner Adventure, the Evelina M. Goulart and the Ernestina Morrissey on which he is working as owner’s representative. Other current projects include operating Ardelle, Managing his own projects and serving as president of the Essex Historical Society and Ship Building Museum.

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Focus Session: Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science

Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science

Topic 1: Rachel Miller, We are eating our Fleece, Microfiber Pollution and Solutions

You probably just ate some of your foul weather gear or a bit of fleece jacket! Our clothes are breaking up and flowing into our public waterways. In this session, you will see your clothing up close and learn about an emerging microplastic problem, one that will likely prove to be the biggest plastic pollution problem facing our oceans, lakes and rivers – and a solution developed by Rozalia project.

Captain Rachael Miller
Captain Rachael Miller

Rachael Miller is the co-founder/Director of the Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean whose mission is to develop and implement solutions for a clean and healthy ocean through innovation, education, cleanup and research from aboard American Promise a Ted Hood 60’ and dockside locations across the country. She is a member of the US Sailing Training Committee, is a Level 1 and 2 Instructor Trainer and holds a USCG 50 ton Master’s license. She was co-founder of the first ROV-supported shipwreck tour company in North America and works with ROV manufacturer, VideoRay to train ROV pilots. Rachael’s background is in marine studies and underwater archaeology which she studied at Brown University. She lives in Vermont and loves to ski as much as sail.

Topic 2: Tiffany Smythe, Building Climate Resilience in Rhode Island’s Coastal Communities (Or, No Problem Is Too Big for Little Rhody)

Seven feet of sea level rise by 2100 – this is one of the highest credible projections for the impacts of climate change on Newport, Rhode Island, and the one that the state of Rhode Island is using to plan for its future. Climate change can seem like an overwhelming problem – both to explain and to solve – yet it’s arguably the most critical issue facing our ocean and coastal ecosystems, communities and economies. This talk will highlight some of the ways that the smallest state in the nation has taken on this big problem, touching on some of the latest climate science, Rhode Island’s work to make communities like Newport more resilient to these changes, and the state’s success in reducing fossil fuel emissions through the development of the Block Island Wind Farm, the nation’s first offshore wind energy development. We’ll touch on facts and case studies you can share with your students and crew to help them understand not only what is happening but what they can do to help.

Tiffany Smythe
Dr. Tiffany Smythe

Dr. Tiffany Smythe is a coastal management specialist at the University of Rhode Island’s Coastal Resources Center and Rhode Island Sea Grant College Program and an adjunct professor in the URI Department of Marine Affairs. She specializes in offshore renewable energy, climate resilience, marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management, and marine transportation and recreation. She was one of the principal co-authors of the RI Ocean Special Area Management Plan, which led to the siting of the Block Island Wind Farm, the nation’s first offshore wind energy development. Tiffany started at URI as a graduate student, earning Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Marine Affairs. She worked at CRC/RI Sea Grant as a grad student, and later went on to work in the non-profit, academic, government and consulting sectors with organizations including the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Sea Education Association and the New York Harbor Foundation, before returning to URI. Prior to her career in Marine Affairs, Tiffany earned Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at Columbia University and worked in sail training and education, sailing as crew and teaching staff aboard training ships including the Lettie G. Howard, Spirit of Massachusetts, Harvey Gamage, and Pioneer. She holds a 100-ton Master’s License and is a Senior Fellow with the Environmental Leadership Program and the URI Coastal Institute.

Topic 3: Shelley Brown, Are you trying to teach marine science on a shoestring budget? Try KELP

Sailors for the Sea is the leading ocean conservation organization that engages, educates, inspires and activates the sailing and boating community in the worldwide protection of the ocean. The objective of one of our core programs, KELP (Kids Environmental Lesson Plans) is to educate children about ocean health issues. Beyond simply conveying information, the program takes additional steps to provide the crucial link between knowledge and action so that children will have the background, resources and sense of purpose necessary to take make a difference.

KELP are fun, environmentally-minded and solution-oriented lesson plans created with informal educators in mind. Whether you are on a dock, a boat, or on land – these lesson plans can be easily taught with minimal preparation and simple materials found at the marina, in a household or at a grocery store. Currently, we have 41 modules that address important ocean health topics including sea level rise, overfishing, ocean acidification and plastic pollution. We will show you how fun and easy it is to teach with KELP with a live demonstration.

Shelley Brown is the education director for the global ocean conservation organization, Sailors for the Sea. Their mission is to engage, educate and activate the sailing and boating community about ocean health issues. A native Rhode Islander, Shelley has always been interested in the interactions between humans and our ocean. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Rhode Island, researching how increases in water temperature, hypoxia, and other anthropogenic-induced environmental conditions impact nitrogen cycling microbes in estuaries and coastal ecosystems. Following her PhD, Shelley pursued her passion of educating the public, particularly youth, about ocean conservation and health issues. Before joining Sailors for the Sea, she was a member of the education team on the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the program director of the Block Island Maritime Institute (BIMI). She hopes to inspire people to learn about and care for the ocean, so they are empowered to become the next generation of ocean stewards.

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Focus Session: Limitless: How Today’s Disabled and Veteran Communities Can Become Inspiring Participants in Sail Training

Limitless: How Today’s Disabled and Veteran Communities Can Become Inspiring Participants in Sail Training

Join us for a discussion with panelists who have experienced firsthand what it takes to overcome not only the physical, but the mental and emotional limitations imposed by such difficulties. Discover how sailing has touched their lives, how they’ve seen it make a difference for others, and how you can increase or fill gaps in your programming by integrating vets and the disabled into your offerings.

Presented by
Scott Ford, Warrior Sailing Project
Joe Messere, Team Rubicon
Duncan Souster,  Jubilee Sailing Trust, Lord Nelson and Tenacious

Scott Ford
Scott Ford

Scott Ford is a blind sailor with The Warrior Sailing Program (WSP). He has participated on the WSP’s competitive team for the last three years. In 2016 he was the main trimmer on the teams J-22 for Charleston race week as well as the J-22 worlds in Kingston Ontario, where he also work the bow. Scott has been married for 26 years to his wife Leanne Zoerner, they were born and raised in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. He joined the U.S. Navy in 1988 and worked as a construction Mechanic (CM) in the Seabees. Scott served during the first gulf war and was medically discharged for blindness after serving eight years. In 2007 Scott moved to Traverse city where the schooner Madeline is home ported. Today he serves as an able bodied seaman on board the vessel.

Joe Messere
Joe Messere

Joe Messere recently hung up his camouflage uniform for the more glamorous work gloves and jeans he wears in his disaster relief work as Team Rubicon’s Region N Administrator. He found his calling when they offered him the chance to change the world alongside other people like him who needed to find a new sense of purpose in the community. As a veteran sailor and no stranger to tall ships, Joe has started to see the parallels between experiential education, outdoor team sport therapy for veterans, and his work in disaster response. He believes that everyone’s self worth is raised through sweat, smiles, and a job that can’t be done alone. I bet if you ask him in person about it he’ll point to a member on your crew as a great example, whether they’re able bodied or not.

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Duncan Souster

Duncan Souster was appointed as Chief Executive Officer of the Jubilee Sailing Trust in September 2014, following a long period of voluntary office as a Trustee (2008-2014) and Vice-Chairman (2013). During his time as CEO, Duncan has led the JST’s international expansion and growth of new programmes with corporate, educational and charitable partners .

Duncan is a former Global Sales Director for ManpowerGroup, a Fortune 500 business services firm, where he was responsible for $6bn of revenues across their footprint of 86 countries and diverse business lines. He was also their global diversity champion. He is a life-long sailor, classic car enthusiast, and has a particular empathy for the JST’s work having lived, for many years, with his disabled mother.

In addition to his work at The Jubilee Sailing Trust, Duncan is also a Trustee of another charity, VCM, which helps disadvantaged students improve life skills through music. He lives in Central London and Winchester.

 

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Focus Session: Program Showcase B – Wavertree and Elissa

 Maritime Heritage Showcase B – Wavertree and Elissa

 Showcase 1: Wavertree: a stem-to-stern, keel-to-truck project
The 1885 ship Wavertree in 2015-2016 underwent an unparalleled restoration thanks to funding from the City of New York. Although the South Street Seaport Museum had still not recovered from hurricane Sandy, the institution successfully managed the $13M overhaul over 16 months, completing at last the restoration that was envisioned when the ship first arrived at the Museum in 1970. Captain Jonathan Boulware will speak about how the ship came to be South Street, her vital importance to the mission, the restoration itself, and how this ship preservation project forms the basis of saving the Museum itself.

Presented by

Jonathan Boulware

Captain Jonathan Boulware serves as Executive Director of South Street Seaport Museum in New York City. A passionate advocate for experiential learning and engagement, he is working to reinvigorate the Seaport Museum’s education and public programming—both ashore and afloat—and to reestablish the role of the Museum as beating heart of the original Seaport of New York.
Capt. Boulware joined the Seaport Museum in November 2011, bringing his extensive education background to the Museum’s programs. In October 2012, he directed the preparation of the fleet in advance of Hurricane Sandy. Working with staff, volunteers, and industry experts he formulated a plan to weather the predicted storm surge and wind. All of the Museum’s vessels survived the hurricane intact. For this effort, Capt. Boulware was awarded the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance’s Hero of the Harbor award for preservation of this important maritime resource.
Capt. Boulware has worked both domestically and internationally on efforts related to safety and regulatory interaction in sailing ships, including participation in both USCG and Germanischer Lloyd rig safety protocols. He has twenty-five years experience in non-profit leadership, education and historic ships and although he principally sails a desk at the moment, he still maintains a USCG license as captain of vessels of 500 tons upon oceans. He grew up around Mystic Seaport Museum and learned to sail in the Mystic River. His hobbies are woodworking, cycling, surfing, and music. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and young son, who is growing up in the South Street Seaport.

 Showcase2: Galveston Historical Foundation presents: S.S.V.   ELISSA, the Road to Subchapter R.

A brief talk on the move of the 1877 Barque ELISSA from an uncertain footing to being re-classified as a Sailing School Vessel. How good teamwork and cooperation between GHF and USCG regulators brought a 140 year old Iron sailing hull in line with modern regulations to give ELISSA  a new lease on life.

Presented by
Mark Scibinico
, has been working on the water since 2004. He began his sailing career on the west coast in 2008. Since then he has been sailing on various vessels on both sides of the American continent traveling as far north as Canada and as far south as the Antarctic. He joined Galveston Historical Foundation at the Texas Seaport museum  in 2012 and helped implement ELISSA’s second restoration . He is now responsible for overseeing the maintenance , operation and crew training of the SSV ELISSA, as well as several other smaller vessel run by Galveston Historical Foundation.

 

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Focus Session: Cognitive Bias and Decision Making at Sea

Cognitive Bias and Decision Making at Sea

Every day each of us makes thousands of decisions.  Inevitably, some of these decisions will be bad.  Fortunately, most of our bad decisions have limited consequences, but for those in command of a ship at sea, the ramifications of a bad decision can mean the difference between life and death.  Compounding the problem, are our own brains are hardwired to deceive us.  Cognitive Bias and Decision Making at Sea will explore how we make decisions, discuss the unconscious biases that affect the decision making process, and how we can learn to make unbiased decisions to improve safety in our operations.

Presented by
Captain Chris Gasiorek

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Chris Gasiorek, a native of Michigan, has been drawn to the water since his earliest days on the edge of the Great Lakes where he raced and cruised under sail and power.  Chris is a 1995 Graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, and currently holds a USCG License as Unlimited Tonnage Master for Motor and Steam, 500 Ton Master of Auxiliary Sail, and Master of Towing.  After graduation Chris served as master, mate, and sometimes engineer aboard a diverse collection of vessels, ranging from bulk carriers in worldwide trade, record setting racing yachts, research ships, tugs, and sail training ships.    From 2007 to 2014 Chris held the position of Sailing Master and Director of Waterfront Operations and Training at the United States Merchant Marine Academy supervising the underway experiential education of the Academy’s students aboard sail and power training vessels.  In 2014 Chris returned to sea full time and currently serves as Master of an OSV in international service.  Chris lives in Mystic, Connecticut with his wife Tiffany and two spoiled cats.

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Education Forum: Fireside Chat with the experts

Fireside Chat with the Experts – open and honest answers about funding: planning, asking, receiving, and making/keeping funder relationships

If you’ve ever had a fundraising-related question, but no one to ask, this is your chance to get some honest answers from the experts. Who should pay for lunch? Is it OK to admit you Googled a prospective funder? No question is too awkward for our panelists to tackle and our panelists have experience as funders, people who advise funders, nonprofit executives and fundraising strategists/coaches. This is your chance to hear instructive stories about fundraising successes and failures from a funder’s point of view. You will come away from this session with both answers to your questions and some specific plans of action to bring back to your development team.

Presented by
Kate Neubauer
Christine Kendall

Kate Neubauer
Kate Neubauer

 

Kate Neubauer is the Principle of Intertidal Ventures, a consulting and management firm, working collaboratively with clients to design innovative strategies that increase organizational capacity and leverage philanthropy for impact.  With over 15 years of professional experience in fundraising and non-profit management, Kate has served as the Executive Director of the Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center and as a Program Manager for the Schmidt Family Foundation.  She currently resides in Newport, RI and serves on several Board of Directors including Rozalia Project.

Christine Kendall
Christine Kendall

 

Christine Kendall is the Founding Partner of SmarterGive where she provides strategic advice on high-impact philanthropy to individuals, families and businesses.  At SmarterGive, she helps donors to be more effective grantmakers and ultimately to drive greater impact on the lives of others. Prior to SmarterGive, Christine spent much of her career in strategy consulting, at both LEK and FSG. While at FSG, a consulting firm focused exclusively on the social sector, she gained a deep knowledge and understanding social impact. She has not only worked with funders but has experience working with many non-profits, large collaboratives, and government organizations. She has extensive global development experience having worked on projects across the world. Prior to entering consulting, she worked for Dana-Farber Cancer Center, and several research think-tanks in Boston and Washington DC. She has also taught public health at an elementary school in Achaise, Ghana.  Christine has a master’s in healthcare management from the Harvard School of Public Health and a B.A. with honors in economics and history from Colby College. She lives with her family in Weston and, in her free time, she enjoys distance running, yoga, and travelling with her family.

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