Focus Session: Program Showcase – San Salvador, Oliver Hazard Perry

Program Showcase B

Presentations (PDF)
San Salvador Goes to Sea
Oliver Hazard Perry

Showcase 1: San Salvador Goes to Sea
Presenter: Dr. Ray Ashley

This presentation will cover the background of building the galleon San Salvador, including the construction, launching, rigging, certification, and training of the crew for the seven-week Pacific Heritage Tour.

Dr. Ray Ashley
Dr. Ray Ashley

Dr. Raymond Ashley is President/CEO of the Maritime Museum of San Diego. Growing up locally, he became director of the Maritime Museum of San Diego in 1995. He holds a BA in Anthropology from UCSD, a MA in Maritime History and Museum Studies from East Carolina University, and a PhD in History from Duke University, specializing in the history of science, technology and medicine. He has taught courses in history and archeology at UCSD and USD, has published papers in American Neptune and a number of other professional journals, and writes a column for the Maritime Museum’s peer reviewed journal Mains’l Haul.

Dr. Ashley has been sailing for most of his life since spending his senior year in high school on the schooner Westward and has sailed, built, restored, renovated and preserved ships for many years before he came to the Maritime Museum and in the years since. He is a licensed captain for sail, steam and auxiliary vessels of 200 tons domestic (500 tons international) registry, is the Star of India’s  navigator and sails as relief captain for the other vessels of the Museum’s active fleet including the State tall ship Californian, steam yacht Medea, Swift Boat PCF 816, Pilot and most recently, the galleon San Salvador.

Dr. Ashley is a member of many civic and professional organizations and serves or has served on the Boards of the Council of American Maritime Museums, Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA, the North American Society for Oceanic History, the Nautical Research Guild editorial board, the American Sail Training Association, Cabrillo Festival, the San Diego Port Tenants Association, the World Ship Trust, and is President of the American Ship Trust. In 2007, Dr. Ashley was Conference Chair for the Eighth International Maritime Heritage Conference, hosted by the Maritime Museum of San Diego.

In 2014 Dr. Ashley was recognized with lifetime achievement awards by both the Maritime Alliance in San Diego, and the International Maritime Heritage Alliance, for the construction of the Galleon San Salvador. He lives in Chula Vista with his wife Carlynn (with whom he once sailed a 25’ boat through the South Pacific).

 Showcase 2: Oliver Hazard Perry
Presenter:   Chris Dimock, Operations Manager

After a successful first season of programs in New England, America’s brand new Tall Ship Oliver Hazard Perry, will be broadening her route down the east coast of the US and setting her sights for the open ocean, heading to Florida, Bermuda and Cuba in the spring. With our 2017 route covering an impressive 14,000 nautical miles, SSV Oliver Hazard Perry will then sail north this summer, across the Arctic Circle and into the Northwest Passage. This voyage has many dimensions. Primarily to partner with the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography and David Clark Inc. (funded by the National Science Foundation) to conduct ground breaking research on the effects of climate change in the Arctic Regions of the Northwest Passage. There is also a prominent educational aspect to this with high school, undergraduate and graduate students joining the ship as our trainees to sail the vessel into the passage and build on leadership and communication skills, while also assisting scientists with their research. There is also a public awareness aspect through David Clark’s documentary and the live daily video feeds that will be relayed through the Inner Space Center at URI to museums. This is just 5 weeks of a 4 ½ month expedition. The ship will leave Newport on June 15 and return at the end of October. We are currently in the application process for recruiting our 17 professional crew. A minimum of 11 of our 17 professional crew will hold USCG licenses. 2017 is set to be a historic year for Oliver Hazard Perry.

Captain Chris Dimock
Chris Dimock

 

Chris Dimock learned how to sail at the age of 7 and has never looked back since. He raced competitive, modern sailboats in Rhode Island for years without ever seeing a tall ship. One day at a college fair, he ran across a poster of the schooner Bowdoin sailing offshore, which lead him to a degree from Maine Maritime Academy, and formal training in vessel operations. He has worked on tugboats, ferries, and yachts, but has always returned to the traditional sail training world. Chris has sailed on tall ships such as the Bowdoin, Harvey Gamage, Westward, Robert Seamans, Corwith Cramer, and AJ Meerwald.

 

Focus Session – Education Program Showcase

Education Program Showcase

Showcase 1: Falmouth Schools
Presenter: Jonathan L Radtke  

A representative from Falmouth (Maine) Public Schools discussing how sail training programs can provide high school credit for week-long programs 

Jonathan Radtke
Jonathan Radtke

Jon Radtke has been an avid sailor since college.   Jon was the founding partner of Maine’s first successful commercial assistance towing organization as well as the founding operations manager for Portland’s first amphibious tour operation.  In addition to his marine related pursuits, Jon has been a high school social studies teacher for 25 years and the assistant principal at Falmouth High School outside of Portland for five years.  A graduate of Colby College, Jon earned a master’s degree from Harvard University and currently holds a 100 ton near coastal license.

Showcase 2: Putting the Sea in Science: An Integrated Approach
Presenter: Pauline Dion

Boothbay Sea and Science Center (BSSC) is a community sea and science education center offering innovative, experiential and affordable education programs to youth ages 5 to 17. BSSC opens doors of opportunity in STEM fields through boating and marine sciences, creating career pathways and instilling lifelong skills. BSSC began in 2011 as a community collaboration, with local marine-based businesses, schools, social service agencies, state marine research agencies, museums, and community volunteers. A principle partner is Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. The Boothbay Sea and Science Center has provided unique innovative programs for 4 years, carefully adapting as enrollment grew. BSSC is transitioning to a year-round program with new school-based programs.

Pauline Dion
Pauline Dion

 

Pauline T. Dion is a passionate lifelong sailor, Pauline is the Founder, President and acting Executive Director of the Boothbay Sea and Science Center.  Established in June of 2012, BSSC is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Pauline received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (with an emphasis in Adult Oncology) from Salve Regina College, and earned a Masters Degree with an emphasis in Nursing Education from Boston College School of Nursing. She has served as a Clinical Nursing Instructor at several hospitals including St. Elizabeth’s Hospital (Brighton, MA), Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA), and Maine Medical Center (Portland, ME). Pauline held nursing faculty positions at Westbrook Junior College, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital School of Nursing, Bosotn College and MGH Institute of Health Professions.

Pauline Dion is a champion of non-profit advancement, having held fundraising chairmanships for a number of organizations including Daylight Children’s Center, American Cancer Society, Little Red Schoolhouse, Williamstown Elementary School, Leukemia Society, Boothbay Region YMCA, Boothbay Region Land Trust, Boothbay Harbor Yacht Club Junior Program Foundation, Boothbay Region Student Aid Fund, Boothbay Region Community Resources Council, Camp Sunshine, Boothbay Harbor Rendezvous.

She is currently serving on the boards of First Radio Parish Church of America/Daily Devotions, Maine Preservation and the Boothbay Harbor Memorial Library. Pauline chaired the Boothbay Harbor Yacht Club Junior Sailing and Tennis programs from 2005 to 2012. Pauline, born and raised in Minot, Maine as one of eight children, currently resides in East Boothbay, Maine.

Showcase 3: US Sailing
Presenter: Jessica Servis

US Sailing’s REACH program, and how they were able to integrate it into the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® Series during the summer of 2016 in the Great Lakes.

Showcase 4: “Welcome to the  US Power Squadron Neighborhood!”
Presented by: Don Stark and Shirley Heald

Cooperative education opportunities aboard and ashore with United States Power Squadrons.

 

Don Stark
Don Stark

 

Donald Stark, United States Power Squadrons Liaison to Tall Ships America is a life member of USPS and a life time boater.  In his professional life Don spent 32 years in secondary and adult education. He has 3 sailboats including a gaff-rigged catboat and sails on the waters of the Great Lakes and Coastal North Carolina. Don is a member of the National Safe Boating Council.  Don is a Past Commander of the South Hills Power Squadron (Pittsburgh),  Past Commander of District 7(Ohio and Western Pennsyvania) and a Past Staff Commander of the Safety Committee.

Shirley Heald
Shirley Heald

 

 Rear Commander Shirley D. Heald, Advance Pilot, United States Power Squadrons R/C Shirley D. Heald, AP is currently Chair of the USPS National Program Partner Relations Committee.  She has also served on a National Level as Staff Commander of the National Leadership Development Committee and as a Committee Member of the National Safety Committee. Shirley served as District Commander of District 21 in 2009-2010, and as Commander of the Dallas Sail and Power Squadron in 1996-1997. She currently holds the grade of  Advance Pilot and Coastal Navigator in the new USPS on the water certification program. Shirley lives in Dallas, TX where she is a member of and boats with the  Dallas Sail and Power Squadron.  As a sailor, she has chartered and sailed in the Caribbean, Mediterranean, Maine, Chesapeake Bay, and the Texas Gulf Coast.  Shirley is currently retired from a long career in sales in the transportation and logistics industry , with Sea-Land and Ryder Transportation Services and enjoys sailing, playing golf, kick boxing, traveling, and playing bridge and Mahjong.

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Focus Session: Maritime Heritage Showcase A

Maritime Heritage Showcase A

Presentations (PDF)
USS Constitution
Ernestina Morrissey
Schooner Adventure

Showcase 1: “Our National Ship” – Preserving USS Constitution, a War of 1812 Icon

USS Constitution’s status as “America’s Ship of State” stems from her multiple War of 1812 victories. As the world’s oldest commissioned warship afloat, the U.S. Navy has been responsible for this national icon for over 200 years. This talk will review USS Constitution’s preservation, including the 2015-2017 dry docking and restoration work.

Marguerite Desy
Marguerite Desy

Margherita M. Desy is the historian for the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston and USS Constitution. She has previously worked for Historic New England, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Hartford, and, for 20 years, at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.

Ms. Desy has a BA in History & Art History from the College of the Holy Cross, an MA in American Civilization from The George Washington University, and has studied at Sotheby’s institute in London. She has been published in scholarly and popular journals and has been script advisor and on-camera historian for several PBS television shows and documentaries broadcast in the U.S. and Europe.

 

Showcase 2: Another life for the Ernestina Morrissey

National Heritage Fellow and master shipbuilder Harold Burnham of Essex, MA will discuss the ongoing rehabilitation of Schooner Ernestina-Morrissey, a nineteenth century example of the Essex wooden shipbuilding traditions that have spanned four centuries. The official vessel of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is on the rail at Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Maine where Master Shipwright David Short has faired her lines and is installing a new keel, futtocks, frames, planks and aft deck using some of the world’s best shipbuilding materials. The wooden Fredonia schooner Effie M. Morrissey was built in 1894 at the James and Tarr Shipyard in Essex for the Gloucester fishing fleet. She was used for Arctic exploration under Bob Bartlett, served in WWII, and was the last vessel to bring immigrants (from Cape Verde) to the U.S. under the power of sail. Returned to the U.S. in 1982 as a gift from the newly independent Cape Verdean people, the Ernestina sailed as an education vessel until 2005. Renamed Ernestina-Morrissey in 2014, she is a National Historic Landmark.

Harold Burnham
Harold Burnham

 

Harold Burnham grew up in the shipyards of Essex and is known for utilizing traditional “sawn fame and trunnel fasting methods” on his adaptations of historic Cape Ann designs for commercial passenger use. Some of his “passenger fishermen” include, the Fredonia schooner THOMAS E. LANNON, The Privateer FAME, and his family boat the pinky ARDELLE all of which are certified by the Coast Guard for 49 passengers. He has worked on repaired and consulted on a number of other historic vessels and preservation projects including the Gundalow Piscataqua, The Schooner Adventure, the Evelina M. Goulart and the Ernestina Morrissey on which he is working as owner’s representative. Other current projects include operating Ardelle, Managing his own projects and serving as president of the Essex Historical Society and Ship Building Museum.

 

Showcase 3: Preserving the Schooner Adventure for the enrichment of future generations and their love of the sea

The Gloucester Adventure, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit maritime historic preservation and educational organization. We are the stewards of the 1926 dory-fishing Schooner Adventure. Our mission begins with restoration and preservation in perpetuity of the National Historic Landmark Schooner Adventure, one of the last surviving Grand Banks dory-fishing schooners. The Schooner Adventure is a national treasure that has resumed active sailing as an icon of the American fisheries and as a floating classroom for maritime history and environmental education programs. The Schooner will be operated at sea, primarily along the New England coast.,

Captain Stefan Edick, Ship’s Captain and Executive Director

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Focus Session: Material Acquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration

Material Acquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration

Presentations (PDF)
Dana Hewson
Margherita Desy
Harold Burnham

This panel, consisting of Dana Hewson, President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs, Margherita M. Desy, Historian, USS CONSTITUTION, and Harold Burnham, Burnham Boat Building, will discuss the challenges of acquiring materials, ranging from wood to iron, of the right size and quality for large timber restorations. The panel will discuss sourcing, repurposing, and sometimes altering the material for safety or need.

Dana Hewson
Dana Hewson

 

Dana Hewson is Vice President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs and Clark Senior Curator for Watercraft at Mystic Seaport. He has worked at the Museum for over 39 years. His areas of responsibility include the activities and operations of the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard Department, the Watercraft Programs Department as well as curatorial responsibility for the Watercraft Collection. He has served in ad advisory capacity for numerous vessel restoration projects and assisted with the development of the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines for Maritime Preservation, published in 1990. In 2001 he received the Don Turner Award from the USS CONSTITUTION Museum for lifetime achievement in the preservation of watercraft.

Marguerita Desy
Margherita Desy

Margherita M. Desy is the historian for the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston and USS Constitution. She has previously worked for Historic New England, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Hartford, and, for 20 years, at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.

Ms. Desy has a BA in History & Art History from the College of the Holy Cross, an MA in American Civilization from The George Washington University, and has studied at Sotheby’s Institute in London. She has been published in scholarly and popular journals and has been script advisor and on-camera historian for several PBS television shows and documentaries broadcast in the U.S. and Europe.

Harold Burnham
Harold Burnham

Harold Burnham grew up in the shipyards of Essex and is known for utilizing traditional “sawn fame and trunnel fasting methods” on his adaptations of historic Cape Ann designs for commercial passenger use. Some of his “passenger fishermen” include, the Fredonia schooner THOMAS E. LANNON, The Privateer FAME, and his family boat the pinky ARDELLE all of which are certified by the Coast Guard for 49 passengers. He has worked on repaired and consulted on a number of other historic vessels and preservation projects including the Gundalow Piscataqua, The Schooner Adventure, the Evelina M. Goulart and the Ernestina Morrissey on which he is working as owner’s representative. Other current projects include operating Ardelle, Managing his own projects and serving as president of the Essex Historical Society and Ship Building Museum.

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Focus Session: Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science

Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science

Presentations
Eating our Fleece
Building Climate Resilience
Try KELP

Topic 1: Rachael Miller, We are eating our Fleece, Microfiber Pollution and Solutions

You probably just ate some of your foul weather gear or a bit of fleece jacket! Our clothes are breaking up and flowing into our public waterways. In this session, you will see your clothing up close and learn about an emerging microplastic problem, one that will likely prove to be the biggest plastic pollution problem facing our oceans, lakes and rivers – and a solution developed by Rozalia project.

Captain Rachael Miller
Captain Rachael Miller

Rachael Miller is the co-founder/Director of the Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean whose mission is to develop and implement solutions for a clean and healthy ocean through innovation, education, cleanup and research from aboard American Promise a Ted Hood 60’ and dockside locations across the country. She is a member of the US Sailing Training Committee, is a Level 1 and 2 Instructor Trainer and holds a USCG 50 ton Master’s license. She was co-founder of the first ROV-supported shipwreck tour company in North America and works with ROV manufacturer, VideoRay to train ROV pilots. Rachael’s background is in marine studies and underwater archaeology which she studied at Brown University. She lives in Vermont and loves to ski as much as sail.

Topic 2: Tiffany Smythe, Building Climate Resilience in Rhode Island’s Coastal Communities (Or, No Problem Is Too Big for Little Rhody)

Seven feet of sea level rise by 2100 – this is one of the highest credible projections for the impacts of climate change on Newport, Rhode Island, and the one that the state of Rhode Island is using to plan for its future. Climate change can seem like an overwhelming problem – both to explain and to solve – yet it’s arguably the most critical issue facing our ocean and coastal ecosystems, communities and economies. This talk will highlight some of the ways that the smallest state in the nation has taken on this big problem, touching on some of the latest climate science, Rhode Island’s work to make communities like Newport more resilient to these changes, and the state’s success in reducing fossil fuel emissions through the development of the Block Island Wind Farm, the nation’s first offshore wind energy development. We’ll touch on facts and case studies you can share with your students and crew to help them understand not only what is happening but what they can do to help.

Tiffany Smythe
Dr. Tiffany Smythe

Dr. Tiffany Smythe is a coastal management specialist at the University of Rhode Island’s Coastal Resources Center and Rhode Island Sea Grant College Program and an adjunct professor in the URI Department of Marine Affairs. She specializes in offshore renewable energy, climate resilience, marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management, and marine transportation and recreation. She was one of the principal co-authors of the RI Ocean Special Area Management Plan, which led to the siting of the Block Island Wind Farm, the nation’s first offshore wind energy development. Tiffany started at URI as a graduate student, earning Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Marine Affairs. She worked at CRC/RI Sea Grant as a grad student, and later went on to work in the non-profit, academic, government and consulting sectors with organizations including the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Sea Education Association and the New York Harbor Foundation, before returning to URI. Prior to her career in Marine Affairs, Tiffany earned Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at Columbia University and worked in sail training and education, sailing as crew and teaching staff aboard training ships including the Lettie G. Howard, Spirit of Massachusetts, Harvey Gamage, and Pioneer. She holds a 100-ton Master’s License and is a Senior Fellow with the Environmental Leadership Program and the URI Coastal Institute.

Topic 3: Shelley Brown, Are you trying to teach marine science on a shoestring budget? Try KELP

Sailors for the Sea is the leading ocean conservation organization that engages, educates, inspires and activates the sailing and boating community in the worldwide protection of the ocean. The objective of one of our core programs, KELP (Kids Environmental Lesson Plans) is to educate children about ocean health issues. Beyond simply conveying information, the program takes additional steps to provide the crucial link between knowledge and action so that children will have the background, resources and sense of purpose necessary to take make a difference.

KELP are fun, environmentally-minded and solution-oriented lesson plans created with informal educators in mind. Whether you are on a dock, a boat, or on land – these lesson plans can be easily taught with minimal preparation and simple materials found at the marina, in a household or at a grocery store. Currently, we have 41 modules that address important ocean health topics including sea level rise, overfishing, ocean acidification and plastic pollution. We will show you how fun and easy it is to teach with KELP with a live demonstration.

Shelley Brown is the education director for the global ocean conservation organization, Sailors for the Sea. Their mission is to engage, educate and activate the sailing and boating community about ocean health issues. A native Rhode Islander, Shelley has always been interested in the interactions between humans and our ocean. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Rhode Island, researching how increases in water temperature, hypoxia, and other anthropogenic-induced environmental conditions impact nitrogen cycling microbes in estuaries and coastal ecosystems. Following her PhD, Shelley pursued her passion of educating the public, particularly youth, about ocean conservation and health issues. Before joining Sailors for the Sea, she was a member of the education team on the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the program director of the Block Island Maritime Institute (BIMI). She hopes to inspire people to learn about and care for the ocean, so they are empowered to become the next generation of ocean stewards.

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Focus Session: Limitless: How Today’s Disabled and Veteran Communities Can Become Inspiring Participants in Sail Training

Limitless: How Today’s Disabled and Veteran Communities Can Become Inspiring Participants in Sail Training

Join us for a discussion with panelists who have experienced firsthand what it takes to overcome not only the physical, but the mental and emotional limitations imposed by such difficulties. Discover how sailing has touched their lives, how they’ve seen it make a difference for others, and how you can increase or fill gaps in your programming by integrating vets and the disabled into your offerings.

Presented by
Scott Ford, Warrior Sailing Project
Joe Messere, Team Rubicon
Duncan Souster,  Jubilee Sailing Trust, Lord Nelson and Tenacious

Scott Ford
Scott Ford

Scott Ford is a blind sailor with The Warrior Sailing Program (WSP). He has participated on the WSP’s competitive team for the last three years. In 2016 he was the main trimmer on the teams J-22 for Charleston race week as well as the J-22 worlds in Kingston Ontario, where he also work the bow. Scott has been married for 26 years to his wife Leanne Zoerner, they were born and raised in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. He joined the U.S. Navy in 1988 and worked as a construction Mechanic (CM) in the Seabees. Scott served during the first gulf war and was medically discharged for blindness after serving eight years. In 2007 Scott moved to Traverse city where the schooner Madeline is home ported. Today he serves as an able bodied seaman on board the vessel.

Joe Messere
Joe Messere

Joe Messere recently hung up his camouflage uniform for the more glamorous work gloves and jeans he wears in his disaster relief work as Team Rubicon’s Region N Administrator. He found his calling when they offered him the chance to change the world alongside other people like him who needed to find a new sense of purpose in the community. As a veteran sailor and no stranger to tall ships, Joe has started to see the parallels between experiential education, outdoor team sport therapy for veterans, and his work in disaster response. He believes that everyone’s self worth is raised through sweat, smiles, and a job that can’t be done alone. I bet if you ask him in person about it he’ll point to a member on your crew as a great example, whether they’re able bodied or not.

duncan-souster-1-5-lr
Duncan Souster

 

The Jubilee Sailing Trust is a UN-Accredited international charity operating two iconic flagships for social inclusion, Lord Nelson and Tenacious, which operate across the world with a crew of all ages, backgrounds and abilities.  

Duncan was appointed as Chief Executive Officer in September 2014, following a long period of voluntary office as a Trustee (2008-2014) and Vice-Chairman (2013). During his time as CEO, Duncan has led the JST’s international expansion and growth of new programmes with corporate, educational, charitable and governmental partners.  

Duncan is a former Global Sales Director for ManpowerGroup, a Fortune 500 business services firm, where he was responsible for $6bn of revenues across their footprint of 86 countries and diverse business lines. He was also their global diversity champion. He is a life-long sailor, classic car enthusiast, and has a particular empathy for the JST’s work having lived, for many years, with his disabled mother.  

Duncan is delighted to be attending the Tall Ships of America conference and hopes to use the visit to build stronger relations and partnerships with operators across the region. He is also interested in meeting delegates from around the world, interested in using the visit of the JST’s ships to help build stronger, more resilient and connected communities.  

Duncan lives in Central London, UK. 

 

 

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Focus Session: Program Showcase B – Wavertree and Elissa

 Maritime Heritage Showcase B – Wavertree and Elissa

 Showcase 1: Wavertree: a stem-to-stern, keel-to-truck project
The 1885 ship Wavertree in 2015-2016 underwent an unparalleled restoration thanks to funding from the City of New York. Although the South Street Seaport Museum had still not recovered from hurricane Sandy, the institution successfully managed the $13M overhaul over 16 months, completing at last the restoration that was envisioned when the ship first arrived at the Museum in 1970. Captain Jonathan Boulware will speak about how the ship came to be South Street, her vital importance to the mission, the restoration itself, and how this ship preservation project forms the basis of saving the Museum itself.

Presented by

Jonathan Boulware

Captain Jonathan Boulware serves as Executive Director of South Street Seaport Museum in New York City. A passionate advocate for experiential learning and engagement, he is working to reinvigorate the Seaport Museum’s education and public programming—both ashore and afloat—and to reestablish the role of the Museum as beating heart of the original Seaport of New York.
Capt. Boulware joined the Seaport Museum in November 2011, bringing his extensive education background to the Museum’s programs. In October 2012, he directed the preparation of the fleet in advance of Hurricane Sandy. Working with staff, volunteers, and industry experts he formulated a plan to weather the predicted storm surge and wind. All of the Museum’s vessels survived the hurricane intact. For this effort, Capt. Boulware was awarded the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance’s Hero of the Harbor award for preservation of this important maritime resource.
Capt. Boulware has worked both domestically and internationally on efforts related to safety and regulatory interaction in sailing ships, including participation in both USCG and Germanischer Lloyd rig safety protocols. He has twenty-five years experience in non-profit leadership, education and historic ships and although he principally sails a desk at the moment, he still maintains a USCG license as captain of vessels of 500 tons upon oceans. He grew up around Mystic Seaport Museum and learned to sail in the Mystic River. His hobbies are woodworking, cycling, surfing, and music. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and young son, who is growing up in the South Street Seaport.

 Showcase2: Galveston Historical Foundation presents: S.S.V.   ELISSA, the Road to Subchapter R.

A brief talk on the move of the 1877 Barque ELISSA from an uncertain footing to being re-classified as a Sailing School Vessel. How good teamwork and cooperation between GHF and USCG regulators brought a 140 year old Iron sailing hull in line with modern regulations to give ELISSA  a new lease on life.

Presented by
Mark Scibinico
, has been working on the water since 2004. He began his sailing career on the west coast in 2008. Since then he has been sailing on various vessels on both sides of the American continent traveling as far north as Canada and as far south as the Antarctic. He joined Galveston Historical Foundation at the Texas Seaport museum  in 2012 and helped implement ELISSA’s second restoration . He is now responsible for overseeing the maintenance , operation and crew training of the SSV ELISSA, as well as several other smaller vessel run by Galveston Historical Foundation.

 

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