Safety Under Sail Forum: Examining the Impact of Fatigue Beyond Watchstanding

Examining the Impact of Fatigue Beyond Watchstanding

Fatigue is a reduction in efficiency or a developed weakness due to over-exertion.  Aboard ship this can occur not just as a result of the physical demands we place on our bodies and lack of rest, that are a result of 24/7 underway operations,  but can develop when we fail to recognize when we create working environments that don’t promote sustainable lifestyles, be it aboard multi-sail daysail boats, or educational coastal voyages that anchor every night.  This session will provide exercises for small group work for similar program type operators, that will facilitate the identification of fatigue trends and work toward developing strategies for mitigation.

Presented by
Captain Virginia Land McGuire Ed. M, Associate Dean for Financial Aid and Student Services, Associate Professor of Nautical Science, Sea Education Association
Captain Rick Miller, Associate Professor of Marine Transportation, Maine Maritime Academy

Captain Virginia Land McGuire
Captain Virginia Land McGuire

Captain Virginia Land McGuire, Ed M, is the Associate Dean for Financial Aid and Student Services, at Sea Education Association, where she has also served as Associate Professor of Nautical Science since 2000.  She holds a 1600ton Ocean Master’s License for Steam, Motor and Auxiliary Sail Vessels and is a certified Emergency Medical Technician with wilderness designation.  Prior to her appointment to the faculty, she served as Master of a number of Tall Ships including TOLE MORE, LIBERTY CLIPPER and OCEAN STAR. Her professional areas of research include Medical Care in Remote Environments, Meteorology and Teaching and Learning Styles.  She resides on Cape Cod with her family.

Captain Rick Miller
Captain Rick Miller

Captain Richard (Rick) Miller is a Professor of Marine Transportation at Maine Maritime Academy in Castine, Maine. His classes of instruction include Terrestrial Navigation (Coastal Piloting), Celestial Navigation, Seamanship, Meteorology, and Marine Weather Routing. Small sailing boats on Barnegat Bay New Jersey were the foundation for a career on the water. Rick earned his bachelor degree from Springfield College and a Master of Science in Education from Capella University. He has successfully blended his academic training as an educator with his passion for sailing for more than 30 years, sailing on a number of sail training vessels and with the Hurricane Island Outward Bound School. In 2008 he was master aboard Maine Maritime Academy’s schooner Bowdoin for a training expedition to the Arctic along the west coast of Greenland. Rick continues to be active as a mariner, most recently sailing seasonally as a master for Sea Education Association in both the Atlantic and Pacific.

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Safety Under Sail: Risk Management-Developing Policies and Identifying Gaps in Sail Training Operations

Risk Management-Developing Policies and Identifying Gaps in Sail Training Operations

Presentation
Risk Management

In a time where vessel operations are directed by Federal and International Regulations, the move toward a more comprehensive culture of safety management compels us to develop within our own organizations comprehensive guidelines for how we operate.  Sail training programs often include activities beyond the scope of vessel operations but also require the same level of risk assessment and safety management. This session will feature small group discussion focused both on suggested topics as well as provide opportunity for audience members to discuss their own concerns and strategies for managing risk.

Presented by
Captain Rick Miller, Associate Professor of Marine Transportation, Maine Maritime Academy
Captain Jonathan Kabak, Director of Marine Operations, USMMA Sailing Foundation

Captain Rick Miller
Captain Rick Miller

Captain Richard (Rick) Miller is a Professor of Marine Transportation at Maine Maritime Academy in Castine, Maine. His classes of instruction include Terrestrial Navigation (Coastal Piloting), Celestial Navigation, Seamanship, Meteorology, and Marine Weather Routing. Small sailing boats on Barnegat Bay New Jersey were the foundation for a career on the water. Rick earned his bachelor degree from Springfield College and a Master of Science in Education from Capella University. He has successfully blended his academic training as an educator with his passion for sailing for more than 30 years, sailing on a number of sail training vessels and with the Hurricane Island Outward Bound School. In 2008 he was master aboard Maine Maritime Academy’s schooner Bowdoin for a training expedition to the Arctic along the west coast of Greenland. Rick continues to be active as a mariner, most recently sailing seasonally as a master for Sea Education Association in both the Atlantic and Pacific.

Captain Jonathan Kabak
Captain Jonathan Kabak

A native of New York City, Captain Jonathan Kabak is the Director of Marine Operations for the USMMA Sailing Foundation where he coordinates vessel operations, maintenance and crewing.  After getting his start aboard Tall Ships as a young teenager, his diverse career in the Maritime Industry has included stints on Oceanographic Research Vessels, Workboats, High Performance Race Boats, and Academy Training Ships. He holds an Unrestricted STCW Ocean Master’s License and a 1600ton Ocean Masters License for Auxiliary Sail vessels.

When not underway, he works as a consultant, developing and delivering STCW and Maritime training curriculum and providing marine operations services. Jonathan is a member of Tall Ships Americas’ Board of Directors, serving as Chair of the Ship Operations and Safety Committee.  He lives in Brooklyn, NY with his wife Jennifer, and their two children Olivia and Nathaniel.

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Safety Under Sail Forum: Fatigue aboard Sail Training Vessels: Sea Education Association’s Case Study

Fatigue aboard Sail Training Vessels: Sea Education Association’s Case Study

Workloads, rest & fatigue have been a focus of the merchant fleet during the past decade.  Many marine casualty investigations include fatigue as a contributing factor. Traditional sailing vessels often demand unique work schedules and watch rotations resulting in crew fatigue. Understanding the causes and effects of fatigue balanced by a realistic schedule for rest can improve your crew’s performance. SEA’s exploration of workloads, watch rotations, rest, and fatigue offer interesting insight into safe vessel operations.

Presented by
Captain Virginia Land McGuire Ed. M, Associate Dean for Financial Aid and Student Services, Associate Professor of Nautical Science, Sea Education Association

Captain Virginia Land McGuire
Captain Virginia Land McGuire

Captain Virginia Land McGuire, Ed M, is the Associate Dean for Financial Aid and Student Services, at Sea Education Association, where she has also served as Associate Professor of Nautical Science since 2000.  She holds a 1600ton Ocean Master’s License for Steam, Motor and Auxiliary Sail Vessels and is a certified Emergency Medical Technician with wilderness designation.  Prior to her appointment to the faculty, she served as Master of a number of Tall Ships including TOLE MORE, LIBERTY CLIPPER and OCEAN STAR. Her professional areas of research include Medical Care in Remote Environments, Meteorology and Teaching and Learning Styles.  She resides on Cape Cod with her family.

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Safety Under Sail Forum: Revisiting Ship Stability

Revisiting Ship Stability

This session will explore the basics of vessel stability. Capt. Adam Slazas instructs the Stability classes at the Maine Maritime Academy. An overview examining the physical laws affecting a floating body – basic stability theory – will be presented along with some of the principles, terms, and procedures used in the determination of transverse, longitudinal, and damage stability of vessels.  The inclination test, righting arm curves, deck immersion and down flooding will be included in the discussion.

Presented by
Captain Adam Slazas, Department Chair, Marine Transportation, Maine Maritime Academy

Captain Adam Slazas
Captain Adam Slazas

 

Captain Adam Slazas, Associate Professor of Marine Transportation, joined the Maine Maritime Academy faculty in 2007.  In addition to his teaching responsibilities which include Ship Stability and Navigation Rules, he is the current Marine Transportation Department Chair, the Senior Deck Training Officer sailing aboard the T.S. State of Maine during its annual training cruises, and Maine Maritime Academy’s Marine Transportation Cadet Shipping Coordinator.

He earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Marine Transportation from Massachusetts Maritime Academy and holds and a U. S. Coast Guard license as Master, Steam and Motor Vessels, Unlimited Tonnage.    During his previous seagoing career, he sailed in various capacities aboard vessels engaged in petroleum exploration, scientific research, petroleum transportation, and aboard RoRo carriers trading throughout the world.

Capt. Slazas now enthusiastically shares over 23 years of domestic and international shipping experience with future mariners enrolled at Maine Maritime Academy. In 2011-2012, he was chosen by recent alumni to receive the Academy’s prestigious Excellence in Teaching Award.

Pursuing his passion for the sea and interests in foreign cultures as an avid traveler, Captain Slazas has visited well over 100 countries.

Safety Under Sail Forum

Safety Under Sail Forum – 28 January

Updated 1.13.2016

The Safety Under Sail Forum expands the dialogue among professional mariners by presenting case studies of actual incidents at sea, discussing emerging technologies, and sharing best practices so as to constantly insure a high level of safety and professionalism in the sail training industry. Professionals engaged in sail training, sea education, vessel operations, and tall ship events participate in this annual symposium.

Session 1 – Changing Global Weather and Climate
Speaker: Joe Sienkiewicz- Chief, Ocean Applications Branch, NOAA/National Weather Service

The global weather / climate system is changing. We are witnessing extreme weather events routinely such as tropical cyclones, flooding rain, high storm tides, severe mid-latitude storms, and droughts. Fortunately, atmospheric and ocean observing of the earth system and resultant weather prediction capabilities have never been better, especially for prediction timescales of 0 to 5 days. However, the earth system on the weather and climate timescales is very complex and not fully understood. This session will attempt to quantify some of the weather threats and trends as they relate to the operations and safety of traditional sailing vessels, discuss the critical use of weather information to make decisions, and host a discussion on planning and mitigation strategies.

Joe Sienkiewicz
Joe Sienkiewicz

Joe Sienkiewicz is Chief of the Ocean Applications Branch at the NOAA Ocean Prediction Center in College Park, MD. He is in charge of forecast technique development and optimizing the use of ocean and satellite observing systems for ocean weather forecasting for the Ocean Prediction Center. Joe is a graduate of NY Maritime and received his MS in Atmospheric Science from the University of Washington. He was a professional mariner and worked as mate and relief captain on tugboats based out of NY Harbor in the early 80s. His professional interests include: explosively intensifying ocean storms, extreme winds in ocean storms, and wave development and propagation. He has authored and co-authored a variety of peered reviewed articles dealing with aspects of marine weather. Continue reading