Safety Under Sail Forum: Revisiting Ship Stability

Revisiting Ship Stability

This session will explore the basics of vessel stability. Capt. Adam Slazas instructs the Stability classes at the Maine Maritime Academy. An overview examining the physical laws affecting a floating body – basic stability theory – will be presented along with some of the principles, terms, and procedures used in the determination of transverse, longitudinal, and damage stability of vessels.  The inclination test, righting arm curves, deck immersion and down flooding will be included in the discussion.

Presented by
Captain Adam Slazas, Department Chair, Marine Transportation, Maine Maritime Academy

Captain Adam Slazas
Captain Adam Slazas

 

Captain Adam Slazas, Associate Professor of Marine Transportation, joined the Maine Maritime Academy faculty in 2007.  In addition to his teaching responsibilities which include Ship Stability and Navigation Rules, he is the current Marine Transportation Department Chair, the Senior Deck Training Officer sailing aboard the T.S. State of Maine during its annual training cruises, and Maine Maritime Academy’s Marine Transportation Cadet Shipping Coordinator.

He earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Marine Transportation from Massachusetts Maritime Academy and holds and a U. S. Coast Guard license as Master, Steam and Motor Vessels, Unlimited Tonnage.    During his previous seagoing career, he sailed in various capacities aboard vessels engaged in petroleum exploration, scientific research, petroleum transportation, and aboard RoRo carriers trading throughout the world.

Capt. Slazas now enthusiastically shares over 23 years of domestic and international shipping experience with future mariners enrolled at Maine Maritime Academy. In 2011-2012, he was chosen by recent alumni to receive the Academy’s prestigious Excellence in Teaching Award.

Pursuing his passion for the sea and interests in foreign cultures as an avid traveler, Captain Slazas has visited well over 100 countries.

Education Forum: Presentations! How to get and hold their attention

Presentations! How to get and hold their attention

Being passionate and knowledgeable about your program is good, but not enough to give high impact presentations. In this workshop, our dynamic instructor, Bryan Bissell from Dale Carnegie Training, will lead you through exercises that will help you plan presentations and then deliver them in ways that both grab and keep the attention of your audience. Whether you present to inform, persuade or sell, you will leave this session with techniques that will make a difference.

Presented by: Brian Bissell, Dale Carnegie

Bissell_Bryan

Dale Carnegie Training sharpens skills and improves performance of people and organizations through leadership, sales, communication and employee engagement programs. Bryan Bissell holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. Now a Vermont resident, Bryan sells and delivers Dale Carnegie programs in both the United States and South Africa.

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Sea Education Association Reception

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Sea Education Association (SEA) Reception

Date: Thursday, February 9, 2017 from 5:30 to 8:30 P.M.
Location: Rosa Mexicana, (155 Seaport Blvd) across the street from the convention center

Please join President Peg Brandon, W-48, and Victoria Smith, Alumni Relations Coordinator, for an alumni and SEA community reception to network, reconnect, and learn the latest SEA news.

The SEA Community reception is open to SEA alumni, current & past crew, faculty, staff and colleagues.

To RSVP and for more information, please click here

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Focus Session: Maritime Heritage Showcase A

Maritime Heritage Showcase A

Presentations (PDF)
USS Constitution
Ernestina Morrissey
Schooner Adventure

Showcase 1: “Our National Ship” – Preserving USS Constitution, a War of 1812 Icon

USS Constitution’s status as “America’s Ship of State” stems from her multiple War of 1812 victories. As the world’s oldest commissioned warship afloat, the U.S. Navy has been responsible for this national icon for over 200 years. This talk will review USS Constitution’s preservation, including the 2015-2017 dry docking and restoration work.

Marguerite Desy
Marguerite Desy

Margherita M. Desy is the historian for the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston and USS Constitution. She has previously worked for Historic New England, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Hartford, and, for 20 years, at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.

Ms. Desy has a BA in History & Art History from the College of the Holy Cross, an MA in American Civilization from The George Washington University, and has studied at Sotheby’s institute in London. She has been published in scholarly and popular journals and has been script advisor and on-camera historian for several PBS television shows and documentaries broadcast in the U.S. and Europe.

 

Showcase 2: Another life for the Ernestina Morrissey

National Heritage Fellow and master shipbuilder Harold Burnham of Essex, MA will discuss the ongoing rehabilitation of Schooner Ernestina-Morrissey, a nineteenth century example of the Essex wooden shipbuilding traditions that have spanned four centuries. The official vessel of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is on the rail at Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Maine where Master Shipwright David Short has faired her lines and is installing a new keel, futtocks, frames, planks and aft deck using some of the world’s best shipbuilding materials. The wooden Fredonia schooner Effie M. Morrissey was built in 1894 at the James and Tarr Shipyard in Essex for the Gloucester fishing fleet. She was used for Arctic exploration under Bob Bartlett, served in WWII, and was the last vessel to bring immigrants (from Cape Verde) to the U.S. under the power of sail. Returned to the U.S. in 1982 as a gift from the newly independent Cape Verdean people, the Ernestina sailed as an education vessel until 2005. Renamed Ernestina-Morrissey in 2014, she is a National Historic Landmark.

Harold Burnham
Harold Burnham

 

Harold Burnham grew up in the shipyards of Essex and is known for utilizing traditional “sawn fame and trunnel fasting methods” on his adaptations of historic Cape Ann designs for commercial passenger use. Some of his “passenger fishermen” include, the Fredonia schooner THOMAS E. LANNON, The Privateer FAME, and his family boat the pinky ARDELLE all of which are certified by the Coast Guard for 49 passengers. He has worked on repaired and consulted on a number of other historic vessels and preservation projects including the Gundalow Piscataqua, The Schooner Adventure, the Evelina M. Goulart and the Ernestina Morrissey on which he is working as owner’s representative. Other current projects include operating Ardelle, Managing his own projects and serving as president of the Essex Historical Society and Ship Building Museum.

 

Showcase 3: Preserving the Schooner Adventure for the enrichment of future generations and their love of the sea

The Gloucester Adventure, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit maritime historic preservation and educational organization. We are the stewards of the 1926 dory-fishing Schooner Adventure. Our mission begins with restoration and preservation in perpetuity of the National Historic Landmark Schooner Adventure, one of the last surviving Grand Banks dory-fishing schooners. The Schooner Adventure is a national treasure that has resumed active sailing as an icon of the American fisheries and as a floating classroom for maritime history and environmental education programs. The Schooner will be operated at sea, primarily along the New England coast.,

Captain Stefan Edick, Ship’s Captain and Executive Director

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Education Forum: Communicating with impact philanthropists

Communicating with impact philanthropists

Presentation (PDF)
Communicating with Impact Philanthropists

What is impact philanthropy and what does it mean for my organizations? Increasingly philanthropists and funders and focused on impact and measurement, yet it can be difficult to understand or react to their desire to be more impact focused.  This workshop will examine what it means to be impact focused and how your organization can embrace some of the concepts of impact philanthropy so your organization can be more aligned with these funders and ultimately more focused on the impact it is trying to achieve.

Presented by
Christine Kendall, Founding Partner, SmarterGive

Christine Kendall
Christine Kendall

Christine Kendall is the Founding Partner of SmarterGive where she provides strategic advice on high-impact philanthropy to individuals, families and businesses.  At SmarterGive, she helps donors to be more effective grantmakers and ultimately to drive greater impact on the lives of others. Prior to SmarterGive, Christine spent much of her career in strategy consulting, at both LEK and FSG. While at FSG, a consulting firm focused exclusively on the social sector, she gained a deep knowledge and understanding social impact. She has not only worked with funders but has experience working with many non-profits, large collaboratives, and government organizations. She has extensive global development experience having worked on projects across the world. Prior to entering consulting, she worked for Dana-Farber Cancer Center, and several research think-tanks in Boston and Washington DC. She has also taught public health at an elementary school in Achaise, Ghana.  Christine has a master’s in healthcare management from the Harvard School of Public Health and a B.A. with honors in economics and history from Colby College. She lives with her family in Weston and, in her free time, she enjoys distance running, yoga, and travelling with her family.

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Focus Session: Material Acquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration

Material Acquisition for Vessel Construction and Restoration

Presentations (PDF)
Dana Hewson
Margherita Desy
Harold Burnham

This panel, consisting of Dana Hewson, President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs, Margherita M. Desy, Historian, USS CONSTITUTION, and Harold Burnham, Burnham Boat Building, will discuss the challenges of acquiring materials, ranging from wood to iron, of the right size and quality for large timber restorations. The panel will discuss sourcing, repurposing, and sometimes altering the material for safety or need.

Dana Hewson
Dana Hewson

 

Dana Hewson is Vice President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs and Clark Senior Curator for Watercraft at Mystic Seaport. He has worked at the Museum for over 39 years. His areas of responsibility include the activities and operations of the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard Department, the Watercraft Programs Department as well as curatorial responsibility for the Watercraft Collection. He has served in ad advisory capacity for numerous vessel restoration projects and assisted with the development of the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines for Maritime Preservation, published in 1990. In 2001 he received the Don Turner Award from the USS CONSTITUTION Museum for lifetime achievement in the preservation of watercraft.

Marguerita Desy
Margherita Desy

Margherita M. Desy is the historian for the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston and USS Constitution. She has previously worked for Historic New England, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Hartford, and, for 20 years, at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.

Ms. Desy has a BA in History & Art History from the College of the Holy Cross, an MA in American Civilization from The George Washington University, and has studied at Sotheby’s Institute in London. She has been published in scholarly and popular journals and has been script advisor and on-camera historian for several PBS television shows and documentaries broadcast in the U.S. and Europe.

Harold Burnham
Harold Burnham

Harold Burnham grew up in the shipyards of Essex and is known for utilizing traditional “sawn fame and trunnel fasting methods” on his adaptations of historic Cape Ann designs for commercial passenger use. Some of his “passenger fishermen” include, the Fredonia schooner THOMAS E. LANNON, The Privateer FAME, and his family boat the pinky ARDELLE all of which are certified by the Coast Guard for 49 passengers. He has worked on repaired and consulted on a number of other historic vessels and preservation projects including the Gundalow Piscataqua, The Schooner Adventure, the Evelina M. Goulart and the Ernestina Morrissey on which he is working as owner’s representative. Other current projects include operating Ardelle, Managing his own projects and serving as president of the Essex Historical Society and Ship Building Museum.

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Focus Session: Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science

Hot Topics in Ocean Literacy and Marine Science

Presentations
Eating our Fleece
Building Climate Resilience
Try KELP

Topic 1: Rachael Miller, We are eating our Fleece, Microfiber Pollution and Solutions

You probably just ate some of your foul weather gear or a bit of fleece jacket! Our clothes are breaking up and flowing into our public waterways. In this session, you will see your clothing up close and learn about an emerging microplastic problem, one that will likely prove to be the biggest plastic pollution problem facing our oceans, lakes and rivers – and a solution developed by Rozalia project.

Captain Rachael Miller
Captain Rachael Miller

Rachael Miller is the co-founder/Director of the Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean whose mission is to develop and implement solutions for a clean and healthy ocean through innovation, education, cleanup and research from aboard American Promise a Ted Hood 60’ and dockside locations across the country. She is a member of the US Sailing Training Committee, is a Level 1 and 2 Instructor Trainer and holds a USCG 50 ton Master’s license. She was co-founder of the first ROV-supported shipwreck tour company in North America and works with ROV manufacturer, VideoRay to train ROV pilots. Rachael’s background is in marine studies and underwater archaeology which she studied at Brown University. She lives in Vermont and loves to ski as much as sail.

Topic 2: Tiffany Smythe, Building Climate Resilience in Rhode Island’s Coastal Communities (Or, No Problem Is Too Big for Little Rhody)

Seven feet of sea level rise by 2100 – this is one of the highest credible projections for the impacts of climate change on Newport, Rhode Island, and the one that the state of Rhode Island is using to plan for its future. Climate change can seem like an overwhelming problem – both to explain and to solve – yet it’s arguably the most critical issue facing our ocean and coastal ecosystems, communities and economies. This talk will highlight some of the ways that the smallest state in the nation has taken on this big problem, touching on some of the latest climate science, Rhode Island’s work to make communities like Newport more resilient to these changes, and the state’s success in reducing fossil fuel emissions through the development of the Block Island Wind Farm, the nation’s first offshore wind energy development. We’ll touch on facts and case studies you can share with your students and crew to help them understand not only what is happening but what they can do to help.

Tiffany Smythe
Dr. Tiffany Smythe

Dr. Tiffany Smythe is a coastal management specialist at the University of Rhode Island’s Coastal Resources Center and Rhode Island Sea Grant College Program and an adjunct professor in the URI Department of Marine Affairs. She specializes in offshore renewable energy, climate resilience, marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management, and marine transportation and recreation. She was one of the principal co-authors of the RI Ocean Special Area Management Plan, which led to the siting of the Block Island Wind Farm, the nation’s first offshore wind energy development. Tiffany started at URI as a graduate student, earning Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Marine Affairs. She worked at CRC/RI Sea Grant as a grad student, and later went on to work in the non-profit, academic, government and consulting sectors with organizations including the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Sea Education Association and the New York Harbor Foundation, before returning to URI. Prior to her career in Marine Affairs, Tiffany earned Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at Columbia University and worked in sail training and education, sailing as crew and teaching staff aboard training ships including the Lettie G. Howard, Spirit of Massachusetts, Harvey Gamage, and Pioneer. She holds a 100-ton Master’s License and is a Senior Fellow with the Environmental Leadership Program and the URI Coastal Institute.

Topic 3: Shelley Brown, Are you trying to teach marine science on a shoestring budget? Try KELP

Sailors for the Sea is the leading ocean conservation organization that engages, educates, inspires and activates the sailing and boating community in the worldwide protection of the ocean. The objective of one of our core programs, KELP (Kids Environmental Lesson Plans) is to educate children about ocean health issues. Beyond simply conveying information, the program takes additional steps to provide the crucial link between knowledge and action so that children will have the background, resources and sense of purpose necessary to take make a difference.

KELP are fun, environmentally-minded and solution-oriented lesson plans created with informal educators in mind. Whether you are on a dock, a boat, or on land – these lesson plans can be easily taught with minimal preparation and simple materials found at the marina, in a household or at a grocery store. Currently, we have 41 modules that address important ocean health topics including sea level rise, overfishing, ocean acidification and plastic pollution. We will show you how fun and easy it is to teach with KELP with a live demonstration.

Shelley Brown is the education director for the global ocean conservation organization, Sailors for the Sea. Their mission is to engage, educate and activate the sailing and boating community about ocean health issues. A native Rhode Islander, Shelley has always been interested in the interactions between humans and our ocean. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Rhode Island, researching how increases in water temperature, hypoxia, and other anthropogenic-induced environmental conditions impact nitrogen cycling microbes in estuaries and coastal ecosystems. Following her PhD, Shelley pursued her passion of educating the public, particularly youth, about ocean conservation and health issues. Before joining Sailors for the Sea, she was a member of the education team on the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the program director of the Block Island Maritime Institute (BIMI). She hopes to inspire people to learn about and care for the ocean, so they are empowered to become the next generation of ocean stewards.

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